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Pedro Ruiz Calderón
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Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Tue Nov 6th, 2012 09:10 am
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"On Jan. 30, 1540, in Mexico City, at a time when Spain was carving out an empire in the New World, an epic trial got under way. An ordained Catholic priest named Pedro Ruiz Calderón was being prosecuted for practicing black magic. The priest actually bragged about the powers he had acquired according to records a researcher is working on publishing. He claimed to be able to teleport between continents, make himself invisible, make women fall in love with him, predict the future, turn metals into gold, summon and exorcise demons and, most importantly, discover buried treasure."

http://www.livescience.com/22963-16th-century-trial-records-priest-superpowers.html

"The Inquisition in New Spain 1536-1820"(John Hopkins University Press, 2012) - John Chuchiak IV

Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Wed Nov 7th, 2012 08:06 pm
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.

That would be interesting to see if the 'alchemical gold making' was actually a charge levelled against him or simply a boastful claim (in connection, I would imagine, with the one about making others fall in love with him).


I guess it's a rare instance anyway;  I just read Fernando Cervantes' research, The Devil in the New World – The Impact of Diabolism in New Spain (Yale U.P., 1994), and not a single case of 'alchemical' accusation have turned up in his study of numerous archives.

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Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Nov 8th, 2012 04:02 am
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Carl Lavoie wrote:
.

That would be interesting to see if the 'alchemical gold making' was actually a charge levelled against him or simply a boastful claim (in connection, I would imagine, with the one about making others fall in love with him).


I guess it's a rare instance anyway;  I just read Fernando Cervantes' research, The Devil in the New World – The Impact of Diabolism in New Spain (Yale U.P., 1994), and not a single case of 'alchemical' accusation have turned up in his study of numerous archives.

.


I don't know whether William Eamon could shed any light on this:

http://williameamon.com/

(Interesting video at the bottom)

http://www.williameamon.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Masters-of-Fire.pdf


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